favourite module / scenario

Discussion in 'CO2 - Modules' started by Kurt, Nov 26, 2016.

  1. Kurt

    Kurt Member

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    Kameraden , what is your favourite module / scenario , and why ?
     
  2. Kurt

    Kurt Member

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    Anyone ? :watching:
     
  3. Kurt

    Kurt Member

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    Well mine is " Assault on the Saur " , not sure why but I have played it many times .
     
  4. jimcarravallah

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    I tend to like the longer duration higher level operational scenarios involving coordinated efforts among multiple divisions and / or multiple corps to achieve the scenario objectives.

    Those scenarios tend to require a significant amount of attention to detail in discovering the enemy strengths and weaknesses, aligning supply and maneuver capabilities to contain the strengths and exploit the weaknesses, tending to engaged unit combat readiness during the course of the battle, and incremental measurements of plan results during the term of the battle.

    They allow for focus on local combat details down to brigade and battalion levels in the more critical battlefield areas, and delegating broader goals to larger unit leaders in the areas that are less critical to the overall plan at those moments. It fits into a 27-year civilian career I spent with the US Army dealing with future combat logistics planning from the tactical thru strategic levels for new designs of Army combat vehicle platforms / systems.

    Particular favorites include Widening the Corridor (just because I've read a significant amount about Patton's combat philosophy), Encircling Aachen (a broad battlefield scope with relatively limited free combat resources compared to the enemy's strength) and All American over Nijmigen (tactical goals over a wide geographic area with relatively limited resources).

    As my Dad spent four years in Europe during World War II, I tend to take the American side in battles, and favor the offensive operations over the defensive operations.

    Take care,

    jim
     
  5. Kurt

    Kurt Member

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    Interesting feedback , you will like my new scenario covering the final phase of Nordwind then . Three weeks long with a 60 x 44 km map , it represents the fighting on the Alsatian Plain in January 1945 between US Seventh Army and German Heersgruppe G .
    If you don't mind me asking , what unit / formation was your dad with ?
     
    #5 Kurt, Dec 10, 2016
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2016
  6. jimcarravallah

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    He didn't talk much about the details, other than he was moved to the medical arm of the Army Air Corps after they discovered he was a little undersized for infantry service during training (he said it occurred when he was asked to fire a Thompson submachine gun and ended up spraying a stream of bullets up the slope and into the air behind his target on the training range).

    He was assigned to the Army Air Corps, trained in Port Angelus Washington (which I hadn't known until he said he'd been there after I was telling him about my wife's and my 25-wedding anniversary trip to the US Northwest), and then assigned to an overseas unit sent to England.

    He worked as the enlisted helper in a dental section assigned to a headquarters surgical medical detachment for the Army Air Force. Based on that, he would have been assigned to a group or possibly a wing level organization. He indicated that the base he was stationed at included P-38 Escorts, which by the end of the war were relatively rare in Europe, let alone England.

    I had it tracked down once to one of three bases in England based on an end of war TO&E that included the both P-38s and B-24s and either a group or wing command designation at the station (he flew to the Army of occupation site in Germany in the nose of a B-24), but lost the information in a computer hard drive crash.

    Take care,

    jim
     
  7. Kurt

    Kurt Member

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    Thanks , first hand historical information is always fascinating
     

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